Category Archives: Activism

Looking Back: A Month Since the Prop 8 Bomb Dropped

Proposition 8 Protest in Sacramento, by JoeandKelly (Flickr)

“It feels like a personal attack.”

I heard at least five different people say this or something similar on the night of November 4. While friends of mine rejoiced in the streets after Obama’s win, I walked glumly by.  “Yeah that’s great, but… I just lost some of my rights.”  I stayed home from work on November 5.  When I finally stumbled out of my apartment to get to class later that day, I remember glaring at people on the street.  ‘Would you take my rights away? Don’t I deserve to take care of my family?’

The major bum-iness subsided after a few days, leaving me a little hurt and a lot confused.  After spending the better part of a year working for the movement, fighting for LGBT equality, had I really accomplished anything? 

I didn’t point fingers.  Everyone was equally to blame for the passage of Prop 8.  The opposition was sneaky, well-funded (overly so, IMHO.  To quote Wanda Sykes, “The California food banks, their shelves are bare.  Instead of spending your money on hate, why don’t you buy a couple of cans of pork and beans?  Pork and beans, they stick to your ribs, they don’t fill you up like hate).†  And our side made mistakes, too.

But I’ve been overjoyed by the visibility and support from our community and allies.  I was lucky enough to attend both big rallies last month in New York City.  Here are videos of the events that I produced for GLAAD:

Sure, some might ask, “where were these public displays before November 4?”  But I disagree.  This was a wake-up call.  My generation is more involved than ever, and I’m confident for the future.  2010, here we come!

† I’ve lately had this weird food association with Wanda Sykes, ever since she was the talking apple in those Applebees commercials.  So despite the fact that I had just eaten dinner, when she started talking about pork and beans, I was starving.  Wanda, you make a boy wanna eat somethin’ now!  Love you!
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En marchant avec un fantôme

 

Four years ago, I lost a dear friend to suicide.

Arthur “Bob” Markus was 13, gay, and constantly ostracized by his peers. It’s horrifying to imagine, the pressures of adolescence magnified a hundredfold by daily taunts and jeers at school.

This is the ultimate tragedy. There are so many outside forces, many beyond our own control, that can lead to our own demise. We watch them on the nightly news: wars, sinking ships, hurricanes. But when it comes from the inside, a soul so broken that there is no turning back, what is left?

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